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51 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I481)
 
52 From 1881 census

James COOPER M 55 M Burtonwood, Lancashire Head Cashier Clk Padgate Lane Poulton With Fearnhead, Lancashire 1341908 RG11/3800 43/1
Elizabeth COOPER M 55 F Penketh, Lancashire Wife
John CATH W 84 M Warrington, Lancashire Father In Law Formerly Farmer 
Cath, JOHN (I355)
 
53 From 1881 census

Richd P. TABB Hd M Male 35 Retusted, Cornwall, England Music Publisher 4 Men
Alice K. TABB Wife Female 30 St Pauls Covt Gdn, Middlesex, England
Edith G. TABB Daur Female 2 St Giles, Middlesex, England
Frank G. TABB Son Male 7 m Marylebone, Middlesex, England
Eliza RATCLIFFE Servt Female 16 Raydon, Suffolk, England Domtc Servt

Source Information:
Dwelling 140 Gt Titchfield St
Census Place London, Middlesex, England
Family History Library Film 1341030
Public Records Office Reference RG11
Piece / Folio 0136 / 25
Page Number 44
 
Tabb, Richard Prestidge (I387)
 
54 From a letter from Irène in Sept 2000

We stayed at the Hermy till all of a sudden the three sisters decided to marry: first Roy and me, then your parents. Norm's sisters were friends of Auntie Maggie's (Roy's mother). Don't know when they went to Australia. When he - a flautist - came back with a musical comedy he had written and hoped to see on in the West End - and similar hopeful ideas - Auntie Maggie lent him "Nonsuch" while it was empty. And there Roy and I met him, living on rice and raisins, and writing a play. When Nonsuch was let, I asked Mum if he could live in the old kitchen at the Hermy. Cis said "Who IS this chap you are landing on us?" I said he is having the kitchen to live in - nothing to do with you - or any of us. As you may imagine dear Norm became at once the one sane head in the sort of bedlam the Hermy was becoming. He did everything the place needed to keep it standing.
We all felt superior because it was a silly idea to imagine one could write a successful musical. Uncle Bert Sayers said "Someone should tell that young man." But when he had played the music, he thought everything should be done to encourage him. Instead he flabbergasted everyone by marrying Cis, and when war came took a job in armaments up North where he would be unlikely to hear bombs. 
Hillier, Norman Arthur (I576)
 
55 From Colin Lee [2/5/2011]

I thought you would be interested in a recent contact I have made with the son of Arthur Francis May - husband of Jane Dorothy "Dot" Hawke, your great aunt. This son is one Anthony May who was born a few months after the death of his father Arthur Francis May in 1934. While he doesn't have a lot of specific info on Jane, he has some interesting information on his father's activities.

I have also found out, since the probate records and London parish records came online, that Jane died on 26 Sep 1923 at The Villa Bleu, Villafranche sur Mer Alpes, France and probate was granted to Arthur Francis May, effects worth £456. She was born abt 1875 and she married Arthur in St Andrews, Streatham, London on 7 Oct 1908. Your grandfather John G Hawke was a witness at the wedding.
 
May, Arthur Francis (I594)
 
56 From letter from Irène to me, Sept. 2000

School was awful for Lorraine. She went to Woodford as I did, and Cis briefly for her last school years. It is very curious but some people took against Lorraine. She was of course a spoilt baby - so were many others. I think Miss Peak, our brilliant kindergarten head was one. When Lorraine did not "get on" well, it was suggested she did not see properly. The occulist said eyes were quite OK. She suffered from what I can only explain, not knowing the word, as a brain not well synchronised, i.e. one half thinks faster than t'other. She should not be harassed or stressed, but should be greatly encouraged in all she was good at. Remove her from school. Cis of course heard this and rose up and said NO...That it would label her as "different" and nothing was worse than that.
Mum discussed it with Miss Horsley and the result was the headmistress, Mary Horsley, took Lorraine privately for reading lessons, and arranged for her to join the Art classes a year younger than average (that is when I gave up Art...) She left before VI from, mostly because Molly May was about to go there and though younger was far cleveres in school sense. Lorraine went to Domestic Science whatever - and decided to marry: "I don't want to earn my living, but I' not going to sit around like you and Cis. I think on a cruise I might meet someone. here the only good looking men are bus drivers." She used to paralyse me. When she found her very good looking man, he was driving a Bentley. 
Hawke, Lorraine Pauline (I7)
 
57 From War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co, 1939-1945:

HORACE CHARLES CATH
Horace Charles Cath joined the Royal Marines in 1941.
When he was commissioned in 1942 he was appointed Adjutant of the Royal Marine School of Signalling.
In 1944 he landed in France at Arromanches with a Naval Wireless Station Unit, and later served as a Signals Officer in the 5th Royal Marine A.A. Brigade at Ostend. He returned to the United Kingdom in 1945 and was demobilised with the rank of Lieutenant.
He holds the 1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence Medal and War Medal 1939/45.

His good friend at Coutts, Arthur Dunstan Beverley Harré, who was Martin's godfather, was killed on 27.10.1942 in the Battle of Egypt. He had gained a Military Cross for his gallantry in Belgium, before Dunkirk. Lieutenant, Royal Armoured Corps. 
Cath, Horace Charles (I6)
 
58 From Yvonne Walsh, April 2001

My mother's pet name was Fifi, as you know but I really don't know how it came about - but her siblings always used that name, and to this day when I visit with the German cousins, they always speak of "Tante Fifi". she really didn't use Anna Margareta except on legal documents - but always Louise, .... My father always called her Fifi - it has lovely connotations of the Can-can, doesn't it.

Cath Anna Margarethe otherwise Anna Margareta of 62 southfield Avenue Paignton Devon died 29 May 1965 Probate LONDON 22 September to Midland Bank Executor & Trustee Company Limited and Robert St John Walsh solicitor. £16076. 
Welter, Louisa Anna Margareta (I12)
 
59 George Cath
New York, Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924 23rd February 1895

"United States Census, 1900"
Name: George Cath
Titles and Terms:
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1900
Event Place: ED 56 District 2 Providence city Ward 6, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Birth Date: Jun 1868
Birthplace: England
Relationship to Head of Household: Head
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: England
Race: White
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Years Married: 9
Marriage Year (Estimated): 1891
Mother of how many children:
Number of Living Children:
Immigration Year: 1888
Page: 9
Sheet Letter: B
Family Number: 214
Reference ID: 85
GS Film number: 1241507
Digital Folder Number: 004120511
Image Number: 00634
 
Cath, George (I82)
 
60 Grandmère

"Why did they consider themselves grand? Who were they?" There was a legend that Dabert had had an apostrophe (d'Abert) before the Revolution.
"Snobbism du haut commerce." Pierre, who was old and rich, sitting there in the mellow comfort of his library, replied without hesitation. "The Daberts were jewellers in Paris. That is very high-class trade, well connected. Grandpère Girardot was only bonnetier (a draper). He was decently well off, decently educated of course. But you see for yourself this man is not the husband for this woman."
The heavy red leather album lay between us, Grandmère, elderly, stood by a pedestal in the photographer's studio, contemplating a book; pensive, in profile against the plush and plants; dignified, natural. Grandpère's was the head and shoulders portrait of a Victorian bon bourgeois. He was one of a large family from Burgundy. No, I could not see for myself from that album that they were unsuited, but imagine it - yes!
Pauline was a scandal. Born in 1816, spoilt only child of M. and Mme Dabert, autocratic behaviour went unreproved, she considered herself as a duchess - omitting the precept 'noblesse oblige' since apparently no such obligation could be laid upon her. (With the Revolution not twenty-five years ago, if Dabert were ever d'Abert they'd not had time to forget. To drop a title to save your neck might be expedient; to launch a dim rumour - if they did - seems merely knavish). By the time she was fifteen her father had died, her mother, wishing to re-marry, gave ear to a M. Pierre Charles Girardot who had already asked for her daughter's hand and been considered not good enough. Now it was convenient to find him just the right parti. Before Pauline was seventeen they were married, he twelve years older, and adoring.
She ran away with his best friend.
Now this, in this day so commonplace a story, then was so outrageous that her children, let alone grandchildren, never could say anything about it. They didn't know. And anything they did know was not for telling. Pierre, her favourite grandson, the man who knew her best, at the age of eighty could only whisper, as it were behind his hand, to half tell me of an embarrassing occasion at a sea-side resort when he met "his people". For this read seducer, and be none the wiser. Was he a married man? What age was she then? Where were her sons?
When - where - did the runaways stop running? Did they live long in bliss or did sin turn out as boring as the bourgeois existence she ducked? A petulant whim, Grandmère, or a true passion that was tragic? Qui sait?
She, young, indulged and believed beautiful, intelligent and of compelling charm. "Your great-grandmother could make anyone do anything," declared my Mother. What had she to do with such gift? And with such charm? Great-grandpapa never divorced her, never ceased (so they said) to adore. "Si mon mari m'avait battue, je ne l'aurais jamais quitté," as an old woman she said to Pierre; and therein said everything.
When Pierre best remembered her she lived in a huge apartment at Neuille (balcony 36 feet long) a regal old lady still of great charm - and filthy tempers. And so lovely a complexion that a visitor, dripping layers of make-up, once asked her for her secret: "Plenty of soap and water, Madame!" Pierre said he was her favourite because he stood up to her. He used frequently to lunch at her apartment as a young student in Paris. When he was only sixteen she made some derogatory remark of how she never listened to opinions of children and servants. He rose from the table and said "Grandmère, take that back, if you please, or I leave your house". She told him not to be ridiculous, it was not aimed at him; she asked him to sit down. And from that day, said Pierre, he could do whatever he liked with her. Perhaps? He was eighty when he told me so. He was the only child of her favourite son, Paul. There are records of two baby girls who died in infancy (what did Pauline, in her teens, make of that?), two sons survived, my great uncle Paul, Pierre's father, and my grandfather, Gustave, ten years younger.
Mother often told us her oncle Paul was temperamentally like Grandmère, and what she admired, homme du monde. In the war of 1870 she made him a waistcoat lined with sovereigns each sewn round separately so that a slit with a penknife would release one at a time. "He was the gay dog, hence the favourite!" said Mother, who loved him. But a rake, "terrible noceur". No decent girl would marry him. However tante Henriette's parents thought it a step up for her. She accepted him. Grandmère detested her.
"Grandmère", said Pierre, son of Henriette, "had but two sons and two daughters-in-law. She could not tolerate either. But I assure you had she had seven sons and seven daughters-in-law not one woman would have been to her liking."
How many of Gran'mère's dreams expired when Paul, homme du monde, and despised Henriette (the opposite of 'decent' was 'common', not indecent) settled with a small shop (millinery, I believe) with which they were not even successful? It was outside a town, one of those long straight roads leading only to a cemetery. Uncle Maurice said nothing passed their windows but funerals. No doubt M. Girardot had done the best he could for an impossible son. They rewarded him with one very successful offspring: Pierre became an architect and wealthy. With younger son Gustave, it must have been easier. When the boy was sixteen, he was told to go and earn his living.
Gustave went to London, presumably with business introductions, and was in digs in Turnham Green - Tournez le jambon vert, to him. Years later in Paris he visited English business connections, Mr and Mrs Henry Wheeler, when Thomas Wheeler's daughter Mary was staying with them
Gustave proposed by letter, in English, modestly offering her "but a little interior". He won her laughing.
Grandmère was not pleased.
She objected because Mary was English; because she was Protestant; because, after they were married she discovered Mary had dozens of young step-brothers and sisters always needing something of her, "which was a bit much," said Pierre. Mary's 'steps' were a bit much but she never ever would have concealed their existence.
Mary coped with Grandmère. When she received from her a most insulting letter she wrote across it, "If you wish you may speak like this to your dog but not to your daughter-in-law" and returned it. Presumably correspondence lapsed for a while.
"No one," Mother said, "could keep up a quarrel with my Mother." When Gustave and Mary had a second daughter they asked Grandmère to choose a name. Flattered (lonely?) the old lady chose a name that delighted her in a novel she was reading, an English name. My mother was christened Jenny - in the circumstances let off lightly. What a risk to take for the sake of peace! The breach healed, the good uninteresting Gustave (like his father) was forgiven for turning from lapsed Catholic (she brought them up to no religion) to firm Protestant, and for his marriage. When she was old and again a scandal it was Gustave and Mary who gave her a home.
"She was always a scandal," said Mother, "flouting convention." and told of how in the Franco-Prussian war she ran out in the streets of Paris and gave grapes to the marching soldiers. So for years I pictured her, beautiful Pauline Felicite, married at sixteen, gathering up her crinoline, her basket full of grapes, skipping beside the marching columns, flushed with triumph at the hoarse cheer from parched throats, tribute to her youth and beauty ....
Recently in a deplorable moment of research I discovered the date of the German occupation of Paris, deducted date of Pauline's birth and found that when footsore defeated heroes tramped through Paris, Grandmère was fifty-six.... But I am sure she gave them grapes.
She loved to give, at any rate to Jenny her only (living) granddaughter. When she gave the little girl a gold watch inscribed "de Grandmère a sa petite fille", Mother actually wept with joy. One gift Jenny did not appreciate as Grandmère intended: a dress, a white tulle Pauline had loved, a full skirt and a fichu top all the hem lines scalloped. What made her so romantically cling to that? She wanted Mother to be married in it, Mother had other ideas. But the gown came to our family and we wore it at fancy dress parties, taking great care. And in 1938 it dressed the cradle for a great-great-grandson to
Pauline, Martin, without altering a stitch: the waistband placed under the mattress, the flowing skirt spilled over the sides; the fichu draped the cradle head. In 1962 it came nearer to Grandmère having her own way, as the under skirt to the wedding dress of Beryl, her great-great-grandson's bride.
Around the final scandal I could weave no winsome tableau. "Comme un vieux roman policier qu'on ne peut plus dechifrer", wrote my cousin Gustave when we had tried to find out precisely what had happened. "She was always susceptible to flattery," said Mother, "and when she was old it became dangerous. She got in the hands of bad servants who had known how to butter-up to her, you know. Her sons were afraid they'd poison her. It was then my father brought her to live with us."
"When she was old in need of care I begged my mother to take her," Pierre said (his father was dead, devotedly nursed by the despised Henriette), "but Maman could not forgive the way Gran'mère had treated her. They could not be under the same roof. She went to Les Ombrages. Oncle Gustave and tante Mary looked after her but I think Mary could not quite forgive either. Grandmère complained of being kept in her own apartments like a dog sent to its kennel." Which seems exactly how she would complain but not exactly how Mary would behave, unless driven to it - not unlikely. Auntie Wee's non-committal diaries break from bleak statements of weather, health and who went where to state that "the old lady" quarrelled with her servant and the uproar was infernal. One reads with relief "quieter today". Mary, again, must have coped with Grandmère.
It was not poison they feared, my Uncle Maurice, very old, told us, it was blackmail. And there was a court case, real scandal, but he did not know what it was all about. He remembered her as someone gracious and kind. Yet he had written years before to Mother who must have groaned over the difficulties of ageing: "You can't expect to grow old gracefully, there is too much of la fameuse Pauline in you old girl!"
Mother wrote, remembering her, "She left instructions that her 'voile de premiere Communion' was to be put over her when she died so that the Bon Dieu should recognise her! She was vain even in death. She had a sort of thick white wool robe made to wear in her coffin - and she really did look lovely.... She never knew what it was to be ill or have any pain so was very hard on people who suffered. She had a very strong personality and expected to be made a fuss of."
They never told us how Grandmère died, but it was in summer and something prevented the undertakers coming immediately. The nurse strewed coffee grounds under the bed to out-do the odour of death. For the rest of her life Mother could not tolerate the smell of coffee.
Long ago and far away, wafted out on the aroma of burnt beans, nothing tells why your imperious mannerisms enchanted, why those who adored you, adored. I think the mesalliance of Grandpère and Grandmère had long repercussions. Maybe we're not over it yet.
 
Dabert, Pauline Felicite (I751)
 
61 Had two sisters in South Africa. He had gone there about 1900 but died suddenly before Amelia and the children could join him. [No travel or emigration record found]

London, England, Electoral Registers, 1832-1965 about Ernest Krohn
Name: Ernest Krohn
Year: 1893
County or Borough: Lambeth
Ward or Division/Constituency: Lambeth North
Street address: 32 Lambeth walk 
Krohn, Ernest Nicholas (I158)
 
62 He was Thomas Wheeler, born 1816, one of an interminable family of Wheelers who lived in Worcester. He was an auctioneer. And he died, I eventually discovered, at the ripe old age of fifty-six. And when Auntie Wee was no longer there to tell the story, we heard another version: that he preferred to sit back, rather than try to earn again, and use his first wife's money, intended for her daughters, to raise ten more children.
His first marriage was to Sophia Walter, whose twin sister was Louisa, and of this far far away grandmother the only thing we certainly know is how much she loved her mama, for in Her Book -a sort of autograph album, the only thing we have of hers - is this excruciating poem ....

The Bride's Farewell
Mother I quit thy pious care, the thoughtful maiden said,
And I am his, the stranger's now, Till numbered with the dead.
Oh! He has sworn to cherish me and smooth my path of life.
And Mother, I must leave thee now to be the stranger's wife.
'Tis even so, my youth has passed, so jocund and so free
I mourned in spirit to believe I might be torn from thee.
Yet now, my Mother, willingly, I quit thy side
And turn to him who leads me forth, a trembling tearful bride.
It may be he will never cheer my youth as thou has done
It may be he will alight at last the being he has won,
But I am his, the stranger's now, and I am thine no more
And I must onwards on my path as thou has done before.
It may be he will cherish one who leaves her home of rest
To solace him, the one beloved, and she may yet be blessed;
I may not think - emotions rise which I must strive to quell,
Another pang and it is o'er - embrace me - and farewell.

It reduces me to tears as still comes through the spirit of someone tremulous, young, hopeful, and very much beloved. She died, aged twenty-seven, of influenza when my grandmother Mary was a few months old and Auntie Wee not yet two years.
 
Family F244
 
63 Household: 1881 UK Census Name
Relation Marital Status Gender Age Birthplace Occupation
Isaac T. WILSON Head M Male 40 Lambeth, Surrey, General Dealer
Amy WILSON Wife M Female 37 Lambeth, Surrey,
Amelia EASTWOOD Daur M Female 20 Lambeth, Surrey,
Catherine WILSON Daur U Female 10 Lambeth, Surrey, Scholar
Alice WILSON Daur Female 9 Lambeth, Surrey, Scholar
Ernest WILSON Son Male 4 Lambeth, Surrey,
Florence WILSON Daur Female 4 Lambeth, Surrey,
Albert WILSON Son Male 3 m Lambeth, Surrey,

Source Information: Dwelling 18 New St
Census Place Lambeth, Surrey, England
Family History Library Film 1341136
Public Records Office Reference RG11 / 0595 / 110 / 32
 
Wilson, Isaac Thomas (I151)
 
64 HOWARD "DOUG" CATH
Obituary
Guest Book
1 entry
The Guest Book is expired.
Restore the Guest Book

Howard "Doug" Cath, 88, of Glenville, passed away peacefully on Sunday, November 6, 2011. Born in Schenectady on June 29, 1923, he was the son of the late Howard and Helen (Relyea) Cath. He was raised and educated in Schenectady and a graduate of Nott Terrace High School. During WWII, Doug proudly served as a pilot with the United States Army Air Corps. Doug drove a cement truck for Ready Mix in Albany for over 25 years until his retirement. Following his retirement Doug worked for Agway in Schenectady and later Bonded Roofing in Scotia for several years until his second retirement. Doug enjoyed flying and owned three of his own planes. He also enjoyed making and flying model airplanes and, as a volunteer, taught many young men how to build them. He enjoyed woodworking and skillfully created clocks, frames and many other gifts. He also enjoyed snowmobiling. He will be remembered as a loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. Married on September 4, 1948, Doug is survived by his beloved wife, Irma (Galusha) Cath. He is also survived by three daughters, Karen Conger of Glenville, Sandra Cath of Ballston Lake and Donna (Robert) Clute of Ballston Lake; a sister-in-law, Beatrice Cath of Scotia; eight grandchildren, Dana (Jason) Nemec, Robert Conger, Melissa (Ross Snyder) Conger, Stephen (Heather) Conger, Amy Conger, Nathan Quinlan, Lawrence Yaw and Lindsey Clute; eight great-grandchildren and several nieces, nephews and cousins. In addition to his parents, Doug was predeceased by his brother, Donald Cath. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 1 p.m. at The White Funeral Home, 264 N. Ballston Ave., Scotia followed by interment in Maple Shade Cemetery, Scotia. The family will receive relatives and friends on Wednesday from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the funeral home prior to the service at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to the charity of one's choice . To express condolences visit www.sbfuneralhome.com.
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dailygazette/obituary.aspx?n=howard-cath-doug&pid=154523451#sthash.CiOjWZTf.dpuf 
Cath, Howard Douglas (I40)
 
65 I have not found Frederick's death registration, possibly in 1915. He appears as an inmate at Tooting Home in the 1911 census, a former workhouse but seemingly more comfortable by the time he was there:

From: http://www.workhouses.org.uk/Wandsworth/
Tooting Home, Church Lane, Tooting Graveney
In 1897, new workhouse accommodation was provided for the 'deserving' old and infirm at a site lying between Church Lane and Rectory Lane in Tooting. The buildings, dating from 1888, were formerly St Joseph's Roman Catholic college. The property was acquired by the Wandsworth Guardians for £40,000 with another £30,000 being spent on alterations to the building. A contemporary report described the accommodation:
The grounds are about acres in extent, and when they have been laid out, with the drives in course of construction, will be a great source of pleasure, especially as many boards find that their old men have a great taste for gardening. The building consists of a basement, two floors, and an attic, which will no doubt be used for storage.
The kitchen is well furnished with three big coppers, an excellent range, and the usual fittings. There are also, of course, scullery, pantry, and subsidiary storerooms. There is a clothes storeroom next to this, and needle-room, with various dormitories and smaller rooms. Leaving the basement, and going up to the ground floor, we find apartments for the master and matron, the committee-room, and offices. There are also two large wards with 42 beds in each, and smaller wards, some of which have as few as seven beds, not counting one or two one-bedded rooms for nurses and possibly invalids. The first floor repeats the design of the ground floor, and contains, as well as the wards, the day-rooms. The recreation-room is an excellent one, and will be very bright as a rule, though it lies north and south. Each ward is named after one of the guardians. The beds have wire spring mattress with overlay of hair, flock bolster and feather pillow, three blankets and white counterpane. Each bed has a comfortable chair beside it, and each ward has bath-room and lavatory attached, and each ward has a day-room corresponding with nurses’ rooms at hand.
The establishment became known as the Tooting Home and in 1901 accommodated 605 inmates.
In 1902, cottage-style accommodation was opened to the south of the main building for twenty-two aged married couples. A pair of two-storey houses, linked on each floor, included bed-sitting rooms for each couple, each with its own larder cupboard and grate with a trivet on which to boil water. Communal facilities included a general sitting room, sculleries, toilet and bathrooms. Hot water was provided by a boiler in each basement. A resident attendant had a room on the ground floor.
In 1903, temporary hospital wards with beds for 102 males and 102 females were added at the north-east of the site. The single-storey wards were arranged in a pavilion-plan layout, with four wards placed each side of a central linking corridor which ran parallel with Church Lane. The layout of the site is shown on the 1916 map below.
During the First World War, the buildings were used as the Church Lane Military Hospital.
In 1930, the site was taken over by the London County Council and, as St Benedict's Hospital, provided care for the chronic sick.
The hospital closed in 1981 and housing now occupies the site. The only reminders are the entrance gateway on Church Lane, and the main block's portico and clock tower which have been preserved in the grounds of the modern development.
 
Indermaur, Frederick Henry (I1000)
 
66 Ian Constantinesco writes:
James Hawke died in Maidenhead in May 1938 (age 67), before I met Peggy, in late 1939, so I never knew him. He was well up in Freemasonry - member at Cherrybles Lodge from 1919 to 1837. He was a Freeman of the City of London. He lived at Garden House in Maidenhead with his wife Minnie and had offices in Bow Lane, London. 
Hawke, James (Jim) (I579)
 
67 Ian Constantinesco writes:
Selwyn was a quantity surveyor. Lived in Godalming in Surrey until he went to South Africa to join Mervyn. He never told us much about his work. Some of the work I believe was to do with construction at (military) airfields.

DEATH NOTICE TRANSCRIPTION SHEET

Cape Town Death Notice No: MOOC 7219/88 Filed on: Ref no Film No:

Name of Deceased:Selwyn William Hawke
Birthplace:England 26/01/1901
Nationality:British
Father:Deceased - unknown
Mother:Deceased - unknown
Age at Death:86 years
Condition in Life:
Ordinary Residence:Chapman's Peak Tea Room, Beach Rd, Noordhoek
Marital Status:Unmarried
Surviving Spouse:
Predeceased Spouses
And Dates of Death:

Date of Death:15/8/1988 died of Pneumonia with septicaemia
Place of Death:Fish Hoek
Place of Last Marriage
NotesHe left part of his estate to David Douglas Hawke also known as Dickson William Hawke and to Tina Crawford of England and Jill Teece, Leading Wren, Naval Barracks, Hong Kong.

Will signed again by G. Acton

Comment:

Movable Property:
Immovable Property:
Estate Exceeds £:
Was a Will Left:
Signed at:Beach Rd Noordhoek
Dated on:5 September 1988
Signed by:D.W. Hawke AKA David Douglas Hawke
In capacity of:Nephew 
Hawke, William SELWYN (I589)
 
68 Information about the Miller family from Lesley Miller [Jan 2005] Cath, Mary Rosetta (I323)
 
69 Irène's letter (Sept 2000) to me about Jack; (all under Jack and part also under Lorraine)

Mother stayed on at the Hermy after Dad died really because she couldn't make big decisions without him. Uncle Maurice said she should have gone back to Grenoble "where she had friends", and that was true. She never made friends in England. To start with she never met educated English - the suburban Ladies could not talk to someone who pushed a pram - and proudly. It must have been quite different when she was mistress of the Big House, but not different for her. The Hermy's great advantage was that it was easy for the French to jump on train at Victoria and tram or cab from Norbury station to Hermy.
You can see that a return to France might have been feasible with Cis and Jack, OR with Irène and Lorraine, but having two big ones and two little ones made a spread out family awkward. So we dodged the worst of the wars.
We stayed at the Hermy till all of a sudden the three sisters decided to marry: first Roy and me, then Cissie, then Lorraine. Norm's sisters were friends of Auntie Maggie's (Roy's mother). Don't know when they went to Australia. When he - a flautist - came back with a musical comedy he had written and hoped to see on in the West End - and similar hopeful ideas - Auntie Maggie lent him "Nonsuch" while it was empty. And there Roy and I met him, living on rice and raisins, and writing a play. When Nonsuch was let, I asked Mum if he could live in the old kitchen at the Hermy. Cis said "Who IS this chap you are landing on us?" I said he is having the kitchen to live in - nothing to do with you - or any of us. As you may imagine dear Norm became at once the one sane head in the sort of bedlam the Hermy was becoming. He did everything the place needed to keep it standing.
We all felt superior because it was a silly idea to imagine one could write a successful musical. Uncle Bert Sayers said "Someone should tell that young man." But when he had played the music, he thought everything should be done to encourage him. Instead he flabbergasted everyone by marrying Cis, and when war came took a job in armaments up North where he would be unlikely to hear bombs.
Mum was left with Jack and the huge Hermitage. She put it on the market. It didn't sell till after the war. She bought 155 for Horace and Lorraine and, to be near Lorraine, 48 for herself, Jack and Uncle Brindley (her uncle and Auntie Wee's youngest half-brother), with the upstairs arranged for the Whitlams, disastrous protegés of hers. Lil Whitlam, with whom Mum became obsessed, was to be her housekeeper
Mum had a four-figure overdraft at the Bank (we didn't know). When war broke out, the Bank foreclosed. She lost a lot, and was panic stricken, with no one to turn to.
She decided to sell 48 and live in future between her daughters' homes. Precisely what she envisaged for Jack no one knows. Jack had no intention of moving and never did.

From Jenny's Journal, 3rd October 1934 written at the Hermitage, Thornton Heath

Ma Chambre
As I look round it what a crowd of recollections of all sorts it brings to mind - of things, of people, of happenings. Mostly of people who are dead and gone ... Pierre Girardot, my grandfather whom I only know from hearsay, a "sweet old darling" according to my Mother - a perfect saint to his much-younger-than-himself capricieuse wife.
Pauline Felicite (Dabert) Girardot - Grandmere, the autocratic grande dame. The beautiful spoilt child of a frightened mother - married at 16 to a much-older-than-herself man because she had no dot and he was the best available "parti" and was well off, and her mother wanted her out of the way to re-marry herself. Of course I only knew her as an old lady. The last years of her life were spent at Les Ombrages. She was 85 when she died. Her complexion which she was so proud of remaining lovely to the end with no aids to nature, except plenty of soap and water! A wonderful woman, a perfect tartar able to keep a regiment working under her orders! Everything of hers labelled, ticketed, locked up etc, etc. Lovely old pictures a few of which Maurice and I still have but all Henri had are sold by now. She loved valuable old things - fine embroidery, gossamer silks, "pelures d'ongongs" as she called them.
In the war of 1870 she made her favourite son (Oncle Paul) a waistcoat lined with sovereigns each sewn round especially so that a slit with a penknifie would release one at a time. He, Paul, was 10 years older that my father Gustave - he was the gay dog! donc the favourite ... She left instructions that her "voile de premiere communion" was to be put over her when she died so that the Bon Dieu should recognise her! She was vain even in death, she had a sort of thick white wool robe made to wear in her coffin - and she really did look lovely. When a little girl she gave me my first watch. I cried I was so over-joyed. I was her only granddaughter. At first she would have nothing to do with Papa for marrying an Englishwoman, but made it up when the first child Elise was born. She, of course, spoiled me as I was the only girl in the family. Elise only lived 4 years and Oncle Paul only had one boy. She did not like me being married to an Englishman, but was alright about it. She never knew what it was to be ill or in pain, so was very hard on people who suffered. She had a very strong personality and expected to be made a fuss of.

October 4th - The above recollections are brought back to me first by grandpere's portrait, then by grandmere's, and the things that belonged to her. The next portrait is my father's, Gustave Girardot, second son of the above Pierre and Pauline Felicite Girardot. At 16 his father sent him off to make a living. He came to England and had digs at Turnham Green - "Tournez le jambon vert" as I have heard him call it! He prendre contact avec Uncle Henry and Aunt Elise Wheeler on business in Paris and that is how and where he met Mother. After they were married, Papa having declared he would never leave Paris and would never go into the glove trade, had an offer, after a month in Paris, to be J & R Morley's representative for gloves in Grenoble!!
That is how we four children - Elise, Jenny, Henri and Maurice - were born there, the first boy being named Henri after Uncle Henry and the first girl Elise after Aunt Elise. My name Jenny, pronounced a la francais, being chosen by Grandmere Girardot. I don't know why Maurice was chosen for Maurice's name, but his second name, William, was his godfather's, Mr Woolcot.
We lived in a large flat and when it got too hot in the town we rented a house outside Grenoble. We were at Gyere one summer when I was two and that is the only time I remember Elise; she died that winter of meningitis. Henri was the next and his delicacy was put down to mother's grief for the loss of her first-born. Henri was never expected to be eleve! We were at La maison Marguin when Maurice was born July 7th 1881. It was so hot the nurse took him straight out into the garden. Then the Riondels had that house so our next summmer place was higher up still. La Maison Poulet Jaliffier. Oh! all the recollections of those two places! How I wish I could write them all down. I was too young to remember much of the first (Riondel house), the "farmers" the Murrats, lived in the lower part of it. La mere Rose often comes in my dreams. It was they who said when it thundered that "le Bon Dieu joue aux boules". I remember the piece d'eau there and Henri falling into it ... and having douches with a long tuyau d'arrosage from it, and how bad it made me and how the boys loved it and continued having them when of course I did not. Another recollection of that place is the rats in the roof! Oh! the row they made at night - they must have been playing football!!! They were such big rats! The house was covered with creepers - so pretty! The roof I think was couvert de chaume. There were two "torrents" coming straight down the Rachais each end of the property, usually dry, but when there was a big storm, the stones and rocks rolling down with the water used to wash everything before it! It was a sight to go and see after. Our grelons [hail stones] were like pullet's eggs sometimes! Oh! the damage they did! but how grand our storms were to watch with the mountains all around.
At Poulet Jollifier's house the farm was away from the house. The Rambaults were the farmers, with one daughter Suzanne. [there alas! the memoires cease] 
Girardot, Jenny Louisa (I132)
 
70 Irène's letter (Sept 2000) to me about Jack; (part also under Lorraine)

I will try to find a writer's gift to talk to you of Jack, but don't think anything there can be explained. Some facts:
48 [Coombe Road] was never, ever his house.
Mother stayed on at the Hermy after Dad died really because she couldn't make big decisions without him. Uncle Maurice said she should have gone back to Grenoble "where she had friends", and that was true. She never made friends in England. To start with she never met educated English - the suburban Ladies could not talk to someone who pushed a pram - and proudly. It must have been quite different when she was mistress of the Big House, but not different for her. The Hermy's great advantage was that it was easy for the French to jump on train at Victoria and tram or cab from Norbury station to Hermy.
You can see that a return to France might have been feasible with Cis and Jack, OR with Irène and Lorraine, but having two big ones and two little ones made a spread out family awkward. So we dodged the worst of the wars.
We stayed at the Hermy till all of a sudden the three sisters decided to marry: first Roy and me, then your parents. Norm's sisters were friends of Auntie Maggie's (Roy's mother). Don't know when they went to Australia. When he - a flautist - came back with a musical comedy he had written and hoped to see on in the West End - and similar hopeful ideas - Auntie Maggie lent him "Nonsuch" while it was empty. And there Roy and I met him, living on rice and raisins, and writing a play. When Nonsuch was let, I asked Mum if he could live in the old kitchen at the Hermy. Cis said "Who IS this chap you are landing on us?" I said he is having the kitchen to live in - nothing to do with you - or any of us. As you may imagine dear Norm became at once the one sane head in the sort of bedlam the Hermy was becoming. He did everything the place needed to keep it standing.
We all felt superior because it was a silly idea to imagine one could write a successful musical. Uncle Bert Sayers said "Someone should tell that young man." But when he had played the music, he thought everything should be done to encourage him. Instead he flabbergasted everyone by marrying Cis, and when war came took a job in armaments up North where he would be unlikely to hear bombs.
Mum was left with Jack and the huge Hermitage. She put it on the market. It didn't sell till after the war. She bought 155 for your parents and, to be near Lorraine, 48 for herself. Jack and Uncle Brindley (her uncle and Auntie Wee's youngest half-brother) with the upstairs arranged for the Whitlams, disastrous protegés of hers. Lil Whitlam, with whom Mum became obsessed, was to be her housekeeper
Mum had a four-figure overdraft at the Bank (we didn't know). When war broke out, the Bank foreclosed. She lost a lot, and was panic stricken, with no one to turn to.
She decided to sell 48 and live in future between her daughters' homes. Precisely what she envisaged for Jack no one knows. Jack had no intention of moving and never did.
In the war a friend got him work in an armament factory and saw to it that he was not sacked though he worked so slowly (atrophy) but immaculately.He'd get in exhausted, falling asleep at super when I lived at 48. After that he talked of broadcasting, which he could have done so well, but he never did anything at all. Worse than atrophy (or because of?) he had no self-confidence. Once he said to me "I was never big and strong, but I can see into people's minds and know what hurts. No one came against me at school."
Or anywhere? People only wanted to please him, to have his friendship (we watch it all over again with Geoff). You say "I know some of what Jack did was pretty awful:" I don't know what that means. He never married Dod Allcorn (it would have been disaster). The year I was in Switzerland Cis wrote to me that Mrs Allcorn had turned Jack out of the house and forbidden him ever to have anything more to do with Dod. If that ever rmade any difference to either, I never noticed it. Eventually (as you may have seen) Dod had close friendship with Dick Wakeford (whom - had it not been for Jack - she might long before so sensibly have married) and so Midge, always so demanding and jealous, "sided" with Jack. Therby the four of them grew old together.
Jack, never reasonable, was at times clean crazy. When Mother died she left 48 to her daughters, but Jack was to have use of it, or was not to be turned out and left homeless. At her death Jack, heartbroken, said to me, how wonderful she had been always thinking of him, but we must never forget that 48 was ours should we ever need to sell he would never stand in the way, etc. When he had to go into the Home, questions came up as to what was the financial situation, and it was pointed out that the house was not his. He was so furious Bryan got Mother's will to re-read to him. Furiously Jack simply said Horace and Martin had forged it.....
You see there were tragic difficulties to deal with.

Mum once said to me had Dad lived she did not know how she would have coped between them. Dad was never able to "understand" Jack - or simply didn't cope with the way all the women in the house spoilt him.
I have beguiled some sleepless hours wondering how it would have been if Dad had bought "Milams", a garage in Thornton Heath where Jack spent hours talking motorbikes. Somehow I suppose Dad would have put him to work somehow and kept him in it. After Dad died, I don't know now how Thurloe Place came into it. At some stage someone exporting something?? had a position for a young partner. He met a charming young man with widowed mother. Mum advanced Jack his share of her capital he would inherit. The elder man vanished with it so Jack was left having lost his money and endangered what his sisters might expect? or something - and no one noticed that he still owned the building in Thurloe Place which, after the war sold WELL and had Mum hung on a bit could have made fortunes. When the money came through, she was worried stiff lest Jack considered it all his. She was with us at the time.
He wrote her a really lovely letter saying of course not, he owed her everything anyway, etc.
Many people could only see him as a ne'er do well, spoilt rigid by a mother "who should have turned him out". Many people are very stupid! But how Jack, who over and above all else adored his Mother, could have been so unable to be useful as a son, I shall never understand.
After the war she would not go and live with him in 48 (the Whitlams had vanished when she lost her money). She "couldn't cope". I can understand the feeling, but it wasn't right. Still, without proper house help, perhaps nursing help, no, she couldn't. Families are complicated.

Mother nearly died when Jack was born and the trauma of it made Dad hate the baby (briefly : Mum said to me "Can you imagine a man being so stupid?!)
At the end of his life Jack said "I was never allowed to be a Hawke", but when I pointed out that, without Dad, all naturally revolved round Mum (who was so French) he agreed it was inevitable. And he did hate the Hawkes. The cousins were real thorn-in-flesh. Lorraine took pity on Selwyn, who always turned up at the wrong time in the wrong place, prone to stammer and always under everybody's feet. there was always an open fire in Mum's huge bedroom, and Lorraine and Molly May used the hearth as a good venue for whatever they were up to, and included Selwyn.

Did you know that Jack was very musical? He played the (now your) piano with a touch that rivetted our music mistress once when she happened to be in the house as he magically rendered "The Rustle of Spring". "Who has that wonderful touch?" she asked me. He played drums at private dances, etc.

I'm not telling you anything sensible about Jack. It is too difficult. After Whitgift he was sent to Malvern because there was a good engineering dept. but, because of the War (WWI) it was only making armaments. He absolutely loathed going away to school. I have seen his desperate letters to Cis. I imagine Dad must have thought it imperative to get him away from women (Mum and Auntie Wee and all) where adoring sympathy would wreck him permanently. So at Malvern he managed to catch pneumonia and only began to show hope of recovery after Mum arrived. That is why we all lived in that ghastly place for seven months. It is known for the peculiar misery it breeds. After he left I think no one knew what to make him aim for. And after Dad died there was no hope of authority.
The Harveys of Fothergill & Harvey offered him a job. It was Dad's firm, clothiers, and in order to train him invited him to their workshops in Wales. Never have I seen him - or any young man - more high wide and wonderful than Jack then. He had got shot of school. And when he arrived chez boss of Dad's firm at Llandudno, they fell flat all round him, the senior Harvey treating him like a grandson, servants adoring. He joyously toured the works and learnt all he was there to learn. The Harvey grand-daughters (?) fell for him with outrageious enthusiasm: world at his feet. Then he came back. To work in Dad's office under Uncle Jim, who never spoke to him, never noticed him, left him to show initiative? or meant to be rid of him anyway? It was all failure from then on - but can one wonder?

There is nothing "pretty awful" to tell you about Jack - nothing hushed up or never mentioned. The worst was when he grew so eccentric as he aged. In a sense he might have been a gentleman. Great-aunt Helen, one of Auntie Wee's half-sisters, wrote reprovingly to Mother "Gentlemen do not have jobs, Jenny"......!!! Agatha Christie wrote of her father who never did anything at all but was always so agreeable - and invited friends to dine. She considered agreeableness a very underworked virtue. But I think it requires unearned income for a start, perhaps? And it was never a characteristic of Jack's - just one of his many disguises. Jack hated the Whitlams, the woman with a son and a husband that Mum took up so disasterously the year I was in Switzerland. At times he would have liked to murder - but I think only Cis and I knew that.
Once he was ill, and Lil Whitlam who was a good cook, to please Mum made him a special something and took it up four flights of stairs to his bedroom. She came down glowing "such a sweet boy". I never knew which astonished me most, her naïvité or his genius.
Jack had a gift of deep understanding sympathy. I learnt a lot from him and loved him so much. But, try as I did, I could never belch quite as loud as he could, at will. When Wallace Beery famously did it on film, Pilly cried to Jack "Got you beat!" but Jack scathingly answered "Fool, HE has a microphone" When we surged round Pilly opening packet of fags, all wanting the cigarette card, Pilly said "How they flock around! I must be attractive." Jack said "Never seen a crowd round a nasty street accident?" One never had the last word.
From boyhood his heart and soul were in the Hermitage and perhaps losing it (leaving it) was too much for someone so precariously balanced, so needing props. And he lost all his old friends, mostly so suddenly: Rollo, Ron Chapman, Midge, Gerry all dropped dead. Mother always believed her illness (peritonitis??) at his birth affected the child. She stated that as a medical fact. Does it mean anything?

*****
Jack's Allcorn friends in 1911 Census :
Arthur William Allcorn Head Married Male 36 1875 Kent Tonbridge Commercial Traveller Confectionery
Amy Allcorn Wife Married Female 37 1874 Essex Roxwell -
Winifred Doris (Dod) Allcorn Daughter - Female 10 1901 Surrey Croydon -
Marjorie (Midge) Allcorn Daughter - Female 5 1906 Surrey Croydon -

Address 40 Broughton Road Thornton Heath Surrey
 
Hawke, John Girardot ''JACK'' (I575)
 
71 John and Jenny

Jenny Girardot fell in love with John Hawke when she was twelve years old. And she pushed him into the piece d'eau.
I'm not saying that love was born at the tinkle of that surprising splash - for him perhaps? But for her I believe it had already happened for she thought him so strong that it never occurred to the diabolical child that if she lurched against him as he stood poised at the rim of the pond - goldfish baiting? fountain admiring? just stirring after-lunch coffee? - caught off balance he would fall in. Such a pillar of strength, such a marvellous young man could not fall. Well, he did. No doubt she wanted to be noticed and no doubt she was. How they must have exclaimed and cried out! English though they mostly were, French mannerisms are contagious ... ah non alors! mais voyons! .... And how they must have laughed. He would have been immaculate, for he always was (military in bearing), and probably they had all been to church. I imagine it after Sunday lunch at the Goodridges' at Mont Fleuri where one sat to watch the sunset?
When, half a century later I sat with Mother and her godfather to watch sunset on the Alps, did she say, that was the pond? She found everything so changed, naturally ... it was. But I caught the afterglow of what had been their paradise and knew that paradisal it had been.
The Hawkes lived in another pleasing house a walking distance up the mountain in the then-village of Mont Fleuri. They had four children: John, Jim, Willie and Dot who was so tiny at birth she was never known by any other name though christened after her Mother, Jane, my grandma Hawke, who was born in 1839 Sarah Jane Norrish Goodridge. Her father, William, was a corn merchant in Devon. She was the daughter of his second marriage. William Snow Goodridge of the house in Mont Fleuri was her half brother and my grandpa Hawke's will names him as guardian for his children should they be orphaned. William Goodridge married a French woman, Elise Vallet. They had no children.
The Hawkes were descended from millers in Cornwall, and then in the wool trade, and in one of England's flourishing periods were making their way up admirably, but how John Andrew was with Morley's, a well-known clothier, as their representative in Grenoble I don't know. Probably William Goodridge (doubtless in gloves) got his brother-in-law Hawke a position out there. Anyway it was all set to be a happy and prosperous life for all of them. And then, on a business trip back to England, John Andrew dropped dead on the station platform in Lyons. He was not forty. He left his adoring wife with four children under ten.
Grandma Hawke was a terribly reserved person. She must have been absolutely shattered and even English Mary Girardot (a "woman to whom you felt you could tell anything" a cousin told me, years after) could not get near her. John Andrew Hawke was never spoken of by his widow and never known to his children. All we ever heard was that he enjoyed fishing which was an infliction for his eldest son, having to be quiet, sitting there drowning worms. Was that young John's only memory of the ten short years they knew each other? Jane Hawke did not go back to Devon where, presumably, her parents were still alive. It was many years before she moved from the French house John Andrew left her.
The elder Hawke boys were sent to school in England, and John and Jim spent holidays with cousins on the farm - the Leighs at Kennerleigh Manor. There was their love for life, their enchanted memories, but cum manhood John was placed with Fothergill and Harvey, clothiers of Manchester. He became manager of the Bow Street office in London and took Jim in with him. John detested his office. He did not whine. He saw it as an opportunity to establish himself well and eventually for buying a farm in Devon. He understood business. He worked hard.
Meantime in La Tronche Jenny waited.... Tante Elise (William Goodridge's French wife) predicted she would marry John because, after those Sunday lunches, it was always in his cup the child chose to dip her sugar for her coffee "canard". If anything else ever encouraged Jenny to cling to her belief in their united destiny she never mentioned it. He was seven years older, a popular young man living in England. Grandmère gave her a ring of turquoise and pearls. She made it her talisman for happiness, certain if she wore it, it would bring her her love. The dream grew as she grew. Languid in her teens she was taken to the doctor. English Mary was incensed by the question, "Is she perhaps in love?" These French and their ideas! Her daughter hardly more than a child....
Jenny flirted with John's youngest brother Willy - the darling whom his mother could not bear to send away - it kept her secret safer, and she never flirted, so she insisted, other than in fun, never to be misunderstood, never to hurt. Girls can do such damage she told us over and over again. As children all the English colony went up to Mont Fleuri where Mrs Hawke gave them lessons with her own Willy and Dot. Willy was a nasty spoilt little bully, he swung on Flo Benson's fair plaits and made her cry, but never bullied Jenny, "I would not have cried." Teaching must have been thorough for when they went on to school, lessons were the last thing Jenny bothered with. Extremely entertaining, she clowned, good-hearted and popular. "I had no memory", so higher learning she dismissed as a waste of life, as for her it probably was, knowing so precisely what she wanted, touching her turquoise and pearls.
At her eighteenth birthday her photo was taken. In it she wears a pin brooch in the shape of a dragonfly, tiny turquoise again. Dot gave it to her. And Dot had the photo on her dressing table. John stole it to take back to England. His incensed sister told Jenny sternly not to start trifling with that heart.
Jenny was past master at saying nothing with daunting dignity. She never trifled with any heart. Gaston Cambefort loved her all his life, and so did Georges, the young officer. Another far more splendid officer had asked for her hand before she was eighteen. Nothing ever altered what she knew: that John Hawke was her destiny and she his.
He proposed as they walked together from Les Ombrages up to the Hawke's house at Mont Fleuri. She was nineteen and her parents would not hear of their marrying before she was twenty-three. That was not a long engagement for those days (Dot was to be engaged twelve years), "and we were not together," said Mother, "engagements are all right if you are not on top of each other."
Grandmère was not pleased that her Jenny was to marry an Englishman, and it occurs to me that in all the odd fragmented memories that is all we have of la fameuse Pauline not one suggests that she were ever stupid. What indeed was Jenny Girardot doing, French as she was and born in the Alpes, following a young Englishman whose heart was in the damp Devonshire she hated, who worked in fog-bound London and gave her a home in suburbia? How strange is love.
They married on a broiling hot day in July 1898 and honeymooned at La Grande Chartreuse, in a hotel (not the monastery...) where Jenny objected to English John's cursory ordering of the waiters, "it is not how we speak in France". He changed his tone completely; s'il vous plait, and veiullez bien, and, surely merci beaucoup - for any bread roll or lump of sugar so that they were served before anyone else and bowed round like nobody else, perhaps because of his teasing her but where and when do the French not love young lovers?
John chose a house in Thornton Heath where he had been living, chose it facing a green that had trees on it, not noticing the neighbourhood, only hoping the trees and the dusty green would give a country atmosphere. They did not replace the Alpes, nor had the people anything in common with the community at La Tronche. Jenny for all her liveliness was extremely shy and totally déplacé. Her loneliness was appalling until her child was born and they moved to Norbury where she flouted convention by proudly pushing her own pram.
Eda was a most beautiful baby and a radiant little girl. She was clever, she was lively. Every photo shows a lovely child. The baby that came soon after her when Eda began to talk she called her little titta, from which, somehow, Helen Mary was renamed Cis for life. Eda talked all in a rush: "Titta has-ou cleaned ous goffsticks?" bouncing on the end of Auntie Sunny's bed, polishing the brass bed knobs with her nightie, and Cis, who drawled, "Noah, Edaaa."
When Jack was born Jenny contracted puerperal fever, the children were taken to Les Ombrages, Tiwi came to Norbury, and when they gave up hope Nurse Coker arrived. Jenny recovered. They wheeled her in the bath chair to see the first non-horsedrawn trams go by on the London road. The children came home. "But," Mother would tell us when we were very little, "Dad had lost all his curly hair and I had only married him for that you know."
John and Jenny's youth was over, but they were all together and well again - friends in and out, kindly 'aunts', boisterous 'uncles....
A year later Eda caught a chill, was ailing. They took her to Hastings to benefit from change of air, to get well. And there Eda died (of meningitis?) in the December of her fifth year. The eyes do not cry but the heart cries all the time.
 
Family F7
 
72 July 1927 appointed Typist with British postal Service at LTS Sloane Ex, Nom No 81824 Cath, Berthe Gwendoline [Betty] (I27)
 
73 Kelly's Directories 1884 - 1892 - News Agent at 163 Newhall Street, Birmingham Cath, George (I67)
 
74 Leeuwarden
Dr I. G. Cath +
Vandag is alhier in den ouderdom van 56 jaar overleden dr. Inne Geert Cath.
Dr Cath werd 14 Februari 1882 te Joure geboren en studeerde, na zijn gymnasiale op leiding te Sneek, te Leiden, waar hij in 1908 tot arts werd bevorderd. In Januari 1911 promoveerds hij met lof op een proefschrift getiteld: "De blijvende resuitaten van de myopieoperatie." Daarna was hij drie jaren assisitent bij de oogheelkinddige afdeeling van het academisch ziekenhuis te Leiden, waar hij zich bovendien als neus-, oor- en keelarts specialiseerde. Op 7 November 1911 vestigde hij zich als zoodanig te Leeuwarden. Hij was keurend oogheelkindige bij de Ned. Spooorwegen en van de stuurlieden en machinisten. Voorts was hij leeraar in verbandleer aan de Leeuwarder industrie- en huishoudschool en secretaris van de afdeeling Friesland van de Nederlandsch Mij., ter bevordering der geneeskinde, voogd van het stadsverzorgingshuis. Met prof. dr. W. Koster heeft dr. CAth in het Nederlansch Tijdschrift voor geneeskunde publicaties geschreven over radiumbehandeling. 
Cath, Inne Geert (I126)
 
75 Letter from Robert Felix Goodwin to Seymour's cousin Bert

From 34 Percy St. W1 May 16 1917
My dear Bert,
Ill news travels fast and you may have heard , even before you get this, for I could not write yesterday, and we only heard the terrible news yesterday, that Seymour was killed in action, in France on the 28th of April last.
Poor Boy, he had only a few days experience of his awful surroundings and we hope the end was painless, for the rest, we may safely leave all with God.
He was a pure minded brave and noble lad, and he leaves a gap in our hearts that can never be filled, save by a store of tender memories.
I never wrote to thank you for your letter, enclosing one for Seymour, telling him of the success of his pupils. We thought it real good of you to give him all the credit of their success and I know Seymour would have recognised, and thoroughly appeciated your loyal co-operation in the result, but I fear he never received your letter, he had crossed the Border ere it could have reached him.
A Bright, happy life has gone from us and left us the poorer, but his is all the gain, and we must bear our portion bravely, but it's heavy.
Our dear love to you all, Yours affectionately, Uncle Bob 
Goodwin, Seymour Thomas (I337)
 
76 London, England, School Admissions and Discharges, 1840-1911 about Horace Cath
Name: Horace Cath
Age: 8
Birth Date: Feb 1882
School: Tooting Graveney Boys' School
Address: TOOTING BROADWAY
Borough: Wandsworth
Admission Date: 12 May 1890
Notes: Tooting Graveney School (0568) opened in 1882. Closed or reorganised in 194-
Reference Number: LCC/EO/DIV09/TOO/AD/002

Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 about Horace Cath
Name: Horace Cath
Gender: Male
Age: 22
Estimated birth year: abt 1882
Date of Arrival: 12 Apr 1904
Vessel: Lake Erie - Canadian Pacific line - 1900-1913
Search Ship Database: View the 'Lake Erie' in the 'Passenger Ships and Images' database
Port of Arrival: St John, New Brunswick
Port of Departure: Liverpool, England
Roll: T-506
Original also shows he was born in Surrey and was going to Winnipeg. Occupation ? Clerk

Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First Name(s):H
Last Name:Cath
Number:906
Unit:East Kent Regiment (9th Batn)
Series:Derby Scheme men, 20th January 1916 - 21st June 1916
Regiment:East Kent Regiment (9th Batn)
Reference:2496 / 7
Page number:57
Age:33 Years 0 Months
Height:5ft 7in.
Weight (pounds):135
Chest size (inches):36
Chest Expansion (inches):3
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Clerk
Birthplace:Geneva
County:
Attestation date:01 December 1915
Attestation place:London
Remarks:58 Malvern Rd
Notes:Derby Scheme men. '' Group 1'' is written on the cover and the spine. Group 1 of the Derby Scheme was the classification for single men aged 18; however, it is clear that recruits in this particular register fall into many different Derby Scheme categories. Dates and recruitment centres covered are: Kingston, 20th January 1916 to 21st June 1916, Wandsworth, 20th January 1916 to 13 April 1916; Croydon, 20th January 1916 to 14th April 1916. Recruitment numbers are not entered sequentially and range between 504 and 14710. This volume has been indexed.
________________________________________
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust

1 12 1915: G/11317 Private Horace CATH; 7th (Service) Battalion), The Buffs (East Kent Regiment); born Geneva Switzerland; enlisted St Paul's Churchyard. London, resident 38 Malvern Rd., Surbiton, Surrey, occupation cashier. Height 5' 7", weight 135 lbs, complexion sallow, eyes brown, hair brown, lineal scar top of scalp.
Mobilised: 13 6 1916; posted 11 10 1916 and 21 10 1916
18 11 1916: Missing [Papers state: Died as prisoner of war OR Killed in action] in France and Flanders. Awarded British War & Victory Medal: I.V. no. 397/1, Medal Roll no. 823

In Nov 1916 the 7th Battalion was engaged in the last stages of the Battle of the Somme having been engaged in various earlier stages of the battle that had begun in 1 Jul 1916. The battalion was in Albert on 13 Nov, in Ovillers on 14 Nov and then moved into the front line on 16 Nov. It took part in an attack on Desire Trench on 18 Nov. 18 Nov 1916 was the official end of the Battle of the Somme.
[Iain Kerr - GOONS]

In Memory of HORACE CATH Private G/11317 7th Bn., The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) who died on Saturday, 18th November 1916. Age 36. Additional Information: Son of Horace Cath, of 30, Kenilworth Rd., Penge; husband of Daisy Ethel Cath, of 65, Melfort Rd., Thornton Heath, Surrey. Commemorative Information Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France Grave Reference/ Panel Number: Pier and Face 5 D Location: The Thiepval Memorial will be found on the D73, off the main Bapaume to Albert road (D929). [Commonwealth War Graves Commission]

CATH, Horace; Corps E. Kent R. Rank Pte; Regt. No G/11317. Awarded British and Victory medals: Roll E/2/105B/5, Page 823

BATTLE OF THE SOMME

Infantry Units - 53rd Brigade. (Service of the 7th Bn Buffs: Sep 1914 - 11 Nov 1918)

Battles and Engagements - France and Flanders.

Battle of Albert. 1-13 Jul 1916, including the capture of Montauban, Mametz, Fricourt, Contalmaison and La Boisselle.
Battle of Bazentin. 14-17 Jul 1916, including the capture of Longueval, Trones Wood and Ovillers.
Battle of Delville Wood. 15 Jul-3 Sep 1916.
Battle of Thiepval. 26-28 Sep 1916.
Battle of the Ancre Heights. 1-11 Oct 1916, including the capture of the Schwaben Redoubt, Stuff Redoubt and the Regina Trench.
Battle of the Ancre. 13-18 Nov 1916, including the capture of Beaumont Hamel.

Letters addressed to Mr & Mrs H. Cath
30 Kenilworth Road, Penge, London SE, England
No. 11317 Pte. H. Cath
7th S/B Buffs
A Company
B.E.F
France
Oct. 28th 1916
My dear Father & Mother,
Just a few lines to let you know I am well and still cheerful and smiling though I must admit the life out here is such that no pen can ever adequately describe the conditions although I am hopeful someday of giving you some idea of them. Devastation and mud hold sway in all directions. I am hopeful that I shall be able to send you a few lines again soon, in several days perhaps and until then I guess my occupation will not be quite like anything pleasant, however I have got to come out of it alright.
I have written Daisy to send me a parcel as I am finding it difficult to procure enough food otherwise and money is almost useless. Biscuits and chocolate are about the only eatables obtainable sometimes and they are very dear.
If you should care to send me a parcel please see that packing is secure and address also.
It may take a long time to reach me but it all depends upon where I get to.
All the Boys are cheerful as ever and are sure the Huns wish there were not on our front. We have got the best of it and mean to keep on letting 'em know it until they are whacked.
Hope you are both quite well.
With best love
Your loving son
Horace

As above plus No. 1 Platoon
10 November 1916
My dear Father & Mother,
Very many thanks for your good letter of 3rd November received yesterday on my return from the trenches and I am pleased to note its cheerful tone which harmonises with my own feelings, although there are two words which fit in with experiences recently much loved by the Cockney when he has been up against "it", "Gawd blimey". I may not say where I have been or what I have been doing but I must say that I shall not forget and in due course I hope to give you my impressions of life at the Front. For the present I must keep you cheery and let the goings on here look after themselves. In spite of everything my cheerfulness sticks to me like a good pal just as it does with practically everybody this side of the Bosch's trenches. I am sure I should not be in the same frame of mind were I in their shoes and it is no military secret to say that they are having a very hot time. I have not seen a newspaper for a month and have no particular desire to do so, at the same time I am glad to hear that things are going well with all the Allies who are now unmistakeably "top dogs".
I have not received your parcel yet but am looking forward to it with joyful anticipation just as any schoolboy might. It is jolly good of you and many thanks also for the promise of an Xmas pudding. I do not expect to be home for Xmas worse luck. With regard to the knitted articles the helmet and muffler will be very acceptable if it will not put you to too much trouble and expense. I ought to be able to keep fairly warm with all my kit which includes a leather coat and woollen as well as leather gloves and very thick pants and vests also mittens. I shall not want for clothes or socks of any kind. I had a flannel body belt but have made it into a rifle cover as I cannot wear it, and it helps to protect a good friend from mud, etc.
Have been all the afternoon scraping the mud off my clothes with a knife and have succeeded in getting myself a little less like a "mudded oaf".
Will write again soon. With best love to you both and to Hubert and family.
Your loving son
Horace

Ella Cath writes:

He died of wounds whilst a prisoner of war and has no grave - he'd only been out there a month or so. [This is what his family were told, but I think he was more likely KIA and his body never found] . He could easily have enlisted in St Pauls Churchyard as he worked quite near there but as you say, would not have been buried there.

Our father went to Canada on a Government scheme - must have been quite young - and worked on a pig farm (might have been a general farm) with a mean farmer who fed him on pig meat including the fat and very little else and didn't pay him, so he had quite a job getting back home and eventually worked his way by ship - arrived with very little and I should imagine set him back quite a bit. By the time he was married he was a clerk with a Swiss firm called Baume [& Co] in [21] Hatton Garden - watch and clock makers - and worked on the accounts (so I understand).

Regiment, Corps etc.: Buffs (East Kent Regiment)
Battalion etc.: 7th Battalion.

Formed at Canterbury Sept. 1914-K2-to Purfleet in 55th Bde. 18th Div. April Colchester. May 1915 to Salisbury Plain. July 1915 landed at Boulogne. 11.11.18 55th Bde. 18th Div. France; Pommereuil, east of Le Cateau.

Last name: Cath
First name(s): Horace
Initials: H
Birthplace: Geneva, Switzerland
Enlisted: St Paul's Churchyard, London
Residence: Surbiton, Surrey
Rank: PRIVATE
Number: G/11317
Date died: 18 November 1916
How died: Died
Theatre of war: France & Flanders

CATH Horace of 58 Malvern-road Surbiton Surrey private East Kent regiment died 18th November 1916 in Germany as a prisoner of war Probate LONDON 18 April [1918] to Daisy Ethel Cath widow. Effects £289 4s 4d.

2 letters sent to Daisy, not dated but I think shortly pre-war:

Surbiton,
Tuesday
My dear Daisy,
Many thanks for the note you left for me and also card today. Glad to hear you arrived safely.
I shall certainly not be on starvation diet this side of Friday anyhow. Your estimate of my appetite is certain to keep me employed. I am attacking those provisions which are most likely to go off first. I quite realise what an exquisite comfort it must be for you to have a ‘’lay in’’, however since you bid me think of you in your enjoyment of that luxury, which in obedience to your desire, I shall do. I think I might as a set off ask you to kindly give a thought to my enforced (self imposed) evolutions in cold water, (shiver) at six a.m., which is needful for me to do in order that I may afterwards prepare my breakfast, eat it and then do the chores.
So far your teapot has escaped and that being so I suppose the rest of the crockery needs no mention.
I enclose two cards for you from Edie and Florrie and leave you to reply.
Saw Suie today. She had a good time at Godalming last weekend and was quite ‘’charmed’’ with the place.
I do not think there is anything further to mention except that I hope you will enjoy yourself. Of course Mrs Garrod quite knows how difficult it is to get a word out of you, you are so quiet you know, and probably by the time to come home arrives you will have discovered how really easy it is to talk in fact how awfully difficult it is not to.
Hope the little ones are good. Give my love and kisses to them all.
Much love to you dearest. Do not have a worry about me I am doing famously.
Your loving hubby, Horace

Surbiton
Wednesday
My dearest,
I hope you received my note of yesterday.
It may interest you to know that I continue to look cheerful in spite of my loneliness, that my shadow does not grow less, but that after my latest onslaught on the stock of tommy I am not so sure that there will be a crumb left after tomorrow.
It is really surprising what a lot of pasty one can tuck away when nobody is looking on , and the marvel is that I do not turn a hair or remain sleepless or feel giddy.
I suppose the great joy of being lord and master over the whole house enables me to overcome any of the common ills consequent upon a diet of cooked dough.
Further I do not ask permission to smoke not do I need to seek permission to sit down, so that really life is full of joy ‘cause I’m fond o’ sitting and smoking.
In addition it is such a boon to be able to find things where one leaves them instead of having to hunt all over the estate to find in the end that the butler or chauffeur or some other good intentioned soul has moved them. It is a beastly bore don’t cher know to have to go to bed alone but I can say I am almost free from bruises and scratches now and I do have a great big breakfast in the mornings.
I do hope dear that you are always thinking of me, so much so that you cannot do anything else. I am a most worthy object of thought and bearing in mind all that you have done for me I think you should bestow upon me all the love and affection you are capable of in return. You witness what an extraordinary letter your provisions have caused me to write and all I can say is that the sooner you return the worse it will be for me. Anyone reading this would possibly think I had had a drop but as you know I like a lot and we’ll say no more about it.
Please let me have a line when you are coming home.
Love to you all, Your loving Hubby
 
Cath, Horace Paul (I30)
 
77 Maiden name given as De Burgh-Thomas on birth of children - have not found a previous marriage McCormack, Eiva M (I600)
 
78 Marriage Licence

Vicar General's Office
21st October 1778
Which Day appeared personally John Cath and made oath that he is of the Parish of St George in the County of Middlesex aged upwards of thirty years and a Batchelor and that he intends to marry with Hannah Judd of the Parish of St Mary Whitechaple in the same County aged upwards of twenty one years and a Spinster, and further made oath that she hath had her usual place of abode in the aforesaid Parish of St Mary Whitechaple for the space of four weeks last past and that he not knowing any Impediment by reason of any Precontract Consanguinity Affinity or any other cause whatsoever to hinder the said intended Marriage and he prayed a Licence for them to be Married in the Parish of St mary Whitechaple
[Signed] John Cath
??
Sworn before me [signed] And: Colter Ducarel, Surrogate

From Marriage Register of St Saviour, London, page 565

No: 1414 John Cath of the Parish of St George in the County of Middlesex, Batchelor, and Hannah Judd of this parish, Spinster, were married in this Church by Licence this twenty fifth day of October 1778 by me J Till, curate
This marriage was solemnised between (John Cath
(the mark of + Hannah Judd
in the presence of John Coates, Nich's Meyer, Susanna Poulter 
Family F46
 
79 Martin Cath writes:

I have the barometre that Daddy used to have at Peewit (although I don't remember it at 155) and it is enscribed as follows:

Presented to
H. CATH Esq.
by his friends at
ACCOUNTING & TABULATING CORPORATION OF GREAT BRITAIN LTD
as a token of their esteem
May 18th 1934

He will have been 75 years old when this presentation was made. Did he work until he was that age? If he worked for that company most of his life, did they have an office in Geneva? I suppose that a company specialising in the production of mechanical adding machines might have Swiss connections, not quite clock making but at least similar. It opens up further channels for research. I don't think that Accounting & Tabulating Corporation of Great Britain Ltd are still in business but it may be possible to find out who took them over ( if that was what happenned) and therefore what became of them They might be forerunners of IBM.

Ella Cath writes:

Our Grandfather, Horace, travelled for a Book firm. I can't remember the name, but very well known at the time. He went to France and Germany and must have met his wife on his travels - in fact it sounds as tho' he lived there for a while because they lost the first baby and our father (Horace Paul) was born up a mountain (sounds odd, but it's what we were told!) and Grandfather surprised the family when he turned up with a wife and child

CATH Horace of 31 Greenways Beckenham Kent died 23 July 1938 at Kings College Hospital Denmark Hill London Probate LONDON 16 August to Hubert George Cath Insurance complays official. Effects £684 7s 6d 
Cath, Horace (I33)
 
80 Mary E. CATH Obituary
BOHANNON - Mrs. Cath was born Sept. 30, 1927 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, and passed away on Sept. 7, 2012.
Mary Ellen was educated at Kennedy Collegiate Institute, Windsor, started her career as a legal secretary, and then secretary to the athletic director at Michigan State University. After raising her three sons, she resumed her career as secretary and administrative assistant at Ecol-Sciences and Electronic Warfare Associates in Northern Virginia. She retired in 1998.
Having moved to Mathews County, she immersed herself in numerous organizations such as Mathews Maritime Foundation, Mathews Historical Society, West Mathews Community League, and Brent and Becky's Horticulture Group. She was also a member of the Red Hats, the prayer shawl knitters and bell ringers of the First Presbyterian Church in Gloucester. Her infectious smile and gracious manner endeared her to all who came in contact with her.
She was preceded in death by her father and mother, Fred and Dorothy Handysides; and a brother, Robert.
She is survived by her husband of 61 and one-half years, William Stanwood Cath; sons, Jeffrey, Ian and wife, Peggy, Kenton and wife, Samantha; grandchildren, Sara and husband, Sofie, Jenna and husband, Brandon, Nicholas, Cameron and wife, Mary, Jarrod, Scott; and cherished great-grandchildren, Sonya and Jackson.
The family will have visitation and receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, at Foster-Faulkner Funeral Home, 160 Main Street, Mathews, Va. A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at First Presbyterian Church, 6470 Main Street, Gloucester, Va.
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dailypress/obituary.aspx?pid=159847179#sthash.TcaAWJkT.dpuf 
Handysides, Mary Ellen (I94)
 
81 Name: Donald Cath
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 18 Dec 1954
Death Date: 26 Jan 1979
SSN: 066441399
Enlistment Date 1: 15 Oct 1976
Release Date 1: 26 Jan 1979
US Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010 
Cath, Donald E. (I51)
 
82 Name: Maria Stephanie Scherzinger
Gender: Female
Christening Date: 27 Dec 1858
Christening Place: Konstanz, Baden, Germany
Birth Date: 25 Dec 1858
Birthplace: Konstanz, Baden, Germany
Death Date:
Name Note:
Race:
Father's Name: Franz Scherzinger
Father's Birthplace:
Father's Age:
Mother's Name: Elisabeth Fries
Mother's Birthplace:
Mother's Age:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C03100-9
System Origin: Germany-EASy
GS Film number: 865638
Reference ID:
"Deutschland, Geburten und Taufen 1558-1898," index [FamilySearch]

Ella Cath writes:

You've got Grandma Cath as MARY Scherzinger. She was known as Bertha - should have been Berté - but I think there was something about her being called Stephanie on her birth certificate which came as a surprise - and poor Betty had to suffer being called Bertha (Big Bertha, Bandy Bertha!) all her schooldays, although it is Berthé on her birth certificate - quite a different sound. I understood Grandma Cath to be a governess, was Bavarian, and not much of life's comforts in her upbringing! They ground chestnuts to make coffee.
She was very houseproud - if she had a fringed carpet, the fringe was all in place! And she did seem a bit of an ogress to us, but when we went to tea she took immense pains to provide a super tea - in fact we couldn't eat it all which distressed her, and I'm sure she looked after Grandpa. I rather think she died at the same time as George V, altho' I may be a bit muddled if it was her or Auntie Susie - in fact I think it was Susie. 
Scherzinger, Maria Stephanie [Berthe] (I34)
 
83 Newspaper notice of death:
Thans moeten wij als vaststaand aannnemen, dat onze volende lieve Familieleden tijdens de Jap. bezetting in Indie overl. zijn. Onze Man, Vader, Broeder
GERBEN E. CATH
Hocfdadministrateur v/hSumatra-Landsyndicaat. Ridder Orde Oranje Nassau sneuvelde Febr. 1942 op 50-jarigen leeftijd op de Onderneming Ssepatoekoe te Ranau-Sumatra. Onze Broeder en Zwager
HENDRIK F. CATH
Administrateur van de Ondern Glenmore Estate (Java) werd Mei 1942 door de Jap: Gestapo te Banjoewangi geexecuteerd op de leeftijd van 44 jaar.
Zijne Echtgenoote
ADELHEID CATH-Butow
overleed na korte ongesteldhweid Febr. 1942 te M_awan (Java) op den leeftijd van 36 jaar,
Malang,
Goentoerweg 7,
A. CATH-Bendien en Kinderen
Voorburg (Z.-H.),
Effathalaan, 36
E. THOMEE-Cath
[Dated in pencil 19,1_ 45]

CATH Gerben Eelke of Ranau Palembang Sumatra Netherlands East Indies die 16 February 1942 Administration (with Will) (Limited) LONDON 18 May {1948] to Edwin Gordon Sykes and Harold Walter Sharp solicitors attorneys to Albertine Cath-Bendien. Effects 36000 2s. 7d in England. 
Cath, Gerben Eelke (I128)
 
84 Obituary

Horace G. Cath of 421 Melrose St., Chicago, Nov. 18, 1972. Husband of Margaret F. Cath; father of Thomas Cath of Deerfield; grandfather of Thomas, Margaret and Jeanette Cath; brother of Clarence Cath. Service 10 a.m. Monday at Hebblethwaife Chapel, 1567 Maple Av., Evanston. Interment Memory Gardens Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to your favorite charity.

Copyright 1972, Chicago Tribune. For permission to reprint, contact Chicago Tribune.

Record Number: 19721119dn016 
Cath, Horace George (I88)
 
85 Obituary of Rosella Bull

Mrs. Rosella A. Bull, 79, of Ocala, Florida passed away on Monday, December 20, 2010 after a short illness. She was born on February1, 1931 in Glenville, New York, the daughter of the late Henry and Hazel Galusha. She resided in Scotia, NY for most of her life before moving to Ocala in 1988. She was a 1948 graduate of Scotia High School and worked at the New York Telephone Co. for 26 years.

Rosella is survived by Robert C. Bull, her husband of 28 years; sister Irma Cath of Glenville, NY; daughter Linda (Harry) Loucks; daughter-in-law Kathy Seburn; two sep-sons, Michael Bull of Alexandria, VA and Jeffry Bull on Kwajalein Island; grandsons Michael (Rachele) Seburn of Scotia, Keith (Colleen) Seburn of Charlton, Erik (Jennifer) of Schenectady; granddaughter Kelli Egan of Scotia and 8 great grandchildren as well as nieces, nephews and many loving friends. She was predeceased by brothers Delbert and James Galusha; sister Mildred Waterman; sons Edward and Mark Seburn. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She also was an avid card and domino player.

Visitation will be conducted at Roberts Funeral Home, Bruce West Chapel, 6241 S. W. SR 200, Ocala, Fl (352) 854-2266 on Friday, December 24, 2010 from 1:00pm to 3:00pm with services to follow at 3:00pm. Burial will be at Park Cemetery, Scotia, NY.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Hospice of Marion County.

Roberts Funeral Homes, Bruce Chapel West handled the arrangements. 
Galusha, Rosella (I96)
 
86 on 1901 census as Evy L Bullivant, but this name not found in GRO Bullivant, Winifred Lilian (I615)
 
87 Parents either
Robert & Margery Reed (m 17 May 1758) Bap. 21 May 1770 St Swithun, Sandford, DEV (plus two sisters)
or John and Margaret Burringtom (m. 13 May 1761) Bap. 21 Dec 1772 St Swithun, Sandford, DEV (plus 5 brothers) 
Norrish, Robert (I895)
 
88 Parish Regisiter entries give Parents : Thomas and Jane; Residence: St Mary at Hill: Father's occupation: Broker. W Webster, curate for both christening and burial (8 days later) Cath, Emma (I165)
 
89 Possible Christening records:

Day: 12
Month: May
Year: 1789
Forename: Elizabeth
Othernames:
Surname: Noble
Fathers forenames: Mark
Fathers occupation: Pump Maker
Mothers forenames: Mary
Birth date: 02/03/1789
Address: Torrigton Street
Location of church: Stepney
Parish: St George In The East
Church address: Cannon Street Road
Entry No: 6354
Source Ref: NX 97/277
Transcriber Note:
Original Note:
Record source: Docklands Ancestors

Day: 25
Month: 1
Year: 1778
Forename: Eliz'th
Othernames:
Surname: Noble
Fathers forenames: Tho's
Fathers occupation:
Mothers forenames: Abby
Birth date:
Address: Bell Yard
Location of church: Whitechapel
Parish: St Mary
Church address: Whitechapel Road
Entry No: 2225
Source Ref: X024/089
Transcriber Note:
Original Note:
Record source: Docklands Ancestors

First name(s): Elizabeth

Last name: CATH

Date of burial: 1823

Place of burial: St Mary At Hill

Age at death: 48

Approximate year of birth: 1775

Address at death: Not recorded

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Record source: City of London Burials
 
Noble, Elizabeth (I192)
 
90 Possible marriage

First name(s) Jacob
Last name Indermaur
Birth year -
Marriage year 1818
Spouse's first name(s) -
Spouse's last name -
Place Holme Hale
County Norfolk
Country England
Source Boyd's marriage index, 1538-1850

1851 Census
First name(s), Last name, Relationship, Marital status, Gender, Age, Birth year, Occupation, Birth place
J, Indermaur, Head, Married, Male, 55, 1796, Cabinetmaker, Southwark, Surrey
E, Indermaur, Wife, Married, Female, 52, 1799, -, Hale, Norfolk
S, Indermaur, Daughter, Unmarried, Female, 29, 1822, Upholstress, Southwark, Surrey
M, Indermaur, Daughter, Unmarried, Female, 20, 1831, Governess, Southwark, Surrey
F, Indermaur, Son, Unmarried, Male, 19, 1832, Apprentice Engineer, Southwark, Surrey
H, Indermaur, Son, Unmarried, Male, 16, 1835, Apprentice Cabinetmaker, Southwark, Surrey
 
Indermaur, J (I1022)
 
91 Possible record [but Discharded Dead??]:
Reference: ADM 157/407/47
Description:
Folios 47-50. James Armitage alias James Eastwood, born Yorkshire.
Attestation papers to serve in the Royal Marines at Portsmouth 1845 (when aged 24).
Discharged [discharge date not given] as Dead.
Joined 60th Regiment of Foot 1842 from where he was discharged 1842 having paid £20.
Date: 1845
Held by: The National Archives, Kew 
Eastwood, James Armitage (I351)
 
92 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I655)
 
93 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I656)
 
94 Probate of the Will of John Hawke deceased

This is the last will and testament of me John Hawke of the borough of Bodmin in the county of Cornwall, woollen manufacturer. I give and bequeath to my eldest daughter Ann Elizabeth Hawke now residing with me all my right and interest in all those my Leasehold Premises situate at Clerkenwater in the parish of Helland in the said County of Cornwall together with all other my Leasehold property or any interest I may have in the same or be entitled to at the time of my decease including my money securities for money household goods chattels and effects of what nature kind or quality the same may be after payment of my just debts funeral expenses and the expense of proving this my will. I give and bequeath the same (being all personal) to my said daughter Ann Elizabeth Hawke for her own use and benefit. And I do nominate and appoint my said Daughter Ann Elizabeth Hawke sole executrix of this my last will and testament hereby revoking and making void all other wills at any time heretofore made. In witness whereof I the said John Hawke have hereunto set my hand this twenty eighth day of February one thousand eight hundred and seventy six.
John Hawke
Signed sealed and declared by the said John Hawke as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses.
Richard Vercoe and Mary Wery

The District Registry at Bodmin
[in the margin - Extracted by the Executrix in person
Personal estate under £100]
In Her Majesty's High Court of Justice
be it known, that at the date hereunder written, the last will and testament (a copy of whereof is hereunto annexed) of John Hawke late of the borough of Bodmin in the County of Cornwall woollen manufacturer deceased who died on the second day of March 1876 at Bodmin aforesaid and who at the time of his death had a fixed place of abode at Bodmin aforesaid within the district of the County of Cornwall was proved and registered in the District Registry attached to the Probate Division of Her Majesty's High Court of Justice at Bodmin and that Administration of the personal estate of the said deceased was granted by the aforesaid Court to Ann Elizabeth Hawke, spinster the daughter the sole executrix named in the said will she having been first sworn well and faithfully to administer the same.
[signed] John Bafet(?) Collins
District Registrar
Dated the twenty seventh of March 1876
 
Hawke, John (I765)
 
95 Receipt for 1000 francs paid to M. Duchenne of Boulogne "pour soins que je l'ai donne presqu'a ce jour" dated Paris 3 decembre 1869 Girardot, Gustave (I754)
 
96 Record set British Army Service Records 1760-1915
Document Type Attestation
First Name JAMES EDWARD Last Name CATH
Age At Attestation Years 19 Age At Attestation Months 1
Year Of Birth 1885
Birth Parish HAMMERSMITH Birth Town LONDON
Birth Country ENGLAND Birth County MIDDLESEX
Attestation Day 12 Attestation Month Sept Year 1904
Attestation Corps 4TH BN EAST SURREY REGT
Soldier Number 4059
Attestation Soldier Number 4059
Discharge Corps - Discharge Soldier Number -
Regiment - Rank -
Box 575 Box Record Number 328
Series militia service records 1806-1915 Category Military, armed forces & conflict
Record collection Regimental & service records Collections from Great Britain
[Signed on for 6 years as a Militiaman. Also shown as single, and working as a laundryman. Address given as 6 Jews Row, Wandsworth, with former addresses at 28 South Streat, Beaconsfield, and Freemantle, AUS]

Last name: Cath
First name(s): James E.
Initials: J E
Birthplace: Hammersmith, Middx.
Enlisted: London
Residence:
Rank: PRIVATE
Number: 10395
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Batallion: Ist
Date died: 9 May 1915
How died: Died of wounds
Theatre of war: France & Flanders

Buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France

Regiment, Corps etc.: Highland Light Infantry
Battalion etc.: 1st Battalion.

4.8.14 Ambala: Sirhind Bde. 3rd (Lahore) Div. Sept. 1914 to Egypt on way to France and Sirhind Bde. Remained while the rest of the division went on to France. 1.12.14 landed at Marseilles and rejoined Lahore Div. on 9 Dec. Dec. 1915 to Mesopotamia arriving in Jan. 1916. Jan. 1917 left Lahore Div. and to Tigris Defemce. Sept. 1917 to 51st Bde. 17th Indian Div. 31.10.18 51st Bde. 17th Indian Div. Mesopotamia; Huwaish, on Tigris north of Sharqat.

The Battle of Neuve Chapelle
10 March - 22 April 1915

Elements of the British Expeditionary Force which took part in this engagement:

Order of battle:
First Army (Haig):
IV Corps (Rawlinson): 7th and 8th Divisions
Indian Corps (Willcocks): Lahore and Meerut Divisions

Neuve Chapelle was the first large scale organised attack undertaken by the British army during the war. It followed the miserable winter operations of 1914-15. More Divisions had now arrived in France and the BEF was now split into two Armies. Neuve Chapelle was undertaken by Sir Douglas Haig's First Army, while subsequenet actions were fought by Sir Herbert Smith-Dorrien's Second Army.

The British attack at French suggestion

French Commander-in-Chief General Joffre considered it vital that the Allied forces should take every advantage of their growing numbers and strength on the Western Front, both to relieve German pressure on Russia and if possible break through in France. British commander Sir John French agreed and pressed the BEF to adopt an offensive posture after the months of defence in sodden trenches. Joffre planned to reduce the great bulge into France punched by the German advance in 1914, by attacking at the extreme points in Artois and the Champagne. In particular, if the lateral railways in the plain of Douai could be recaptured, the Germans would be forced to evacuate large areas of the ground they had gained. This belief formed the plan that created most of the 1915 actions in the British sector. The attack at Neuve Chapelle was an entirely British affair - the French saying that until extra British divisions could relieve them at Ypres, they had insufficient troops in the area to either extend of support the action.

The point of attack is selected

Neuve Chapelle village lies on the road between Bethune, Fleurbaix and Armentieres, near its junction with the Estaires - La Bassee road. The front lines ran parallel with the Bethune-Armentieres road, a little way to the east of the village. Behind the German line is the Bois de Biez. The ground here is flat and cut by many small drainage ditches. A mile ahead of the British was a long ridge - Aubers Ridge - barely 20 feet higher than the surrounding area but giving an observation advantage. Some 25km to the south, this flat area is overlooked by the heights at Vimy Ridge. The German lines in the immediate vicinity were very lightly defended. The night before the attack was wet, with light snow, which turned to damp mist on 10 March.

The attack goes in - succeeds at first - gets bogged down

The attack was undertaken by Sir Douglas Haig's First Army, with Rawlinson's IV Corps on the left and Willcock's Indian Corps on the right, squeezing out a German salient that included the village itself. The battle opened with a 35 minute bombardment of the front line, then 30 minutes on the village and reserve positions. The bombardment, for weight of shell fired per yard of enemy front, was the heaviest that would be fired until 1917.

Quote: At 7.30am the artillery bombardment commenced, and never since history has there been such a one. You couldn't hear yourself speak for the noise. It was a continual rattle and roar. We lay very low in our trenches, as several of our guns were firing short.
Captain W.G. Bagot-Chester MC, 2/3rd Ghurka Rifles, Gharwal Brigade, Meerut Division

Three infantry brigades were ordered to advance quickly as soon as the barrage lifted from the front line at 8.05am. The Gharwal Brigade of the Indian Corps advanced successfully, with the exception of the 1/39th Gharwal Rifles on the extreme right that went astray and plunged into defences untouched by the bombardment, suffering large losses. The 25th and 23rd Brigades of the 8th Division made good progress against the village. There were delays in sending further orders and reinforcements forward, but by nightfall the village had been captured, and the advanced units were in places as far forward as the Layes brook. During the night the Germans reinforced their second line in front of the Bois de Biez, and all further attempts over the next few days brought little material success.

Casualties: The British losses in the four attacking Divisions were 544 officers and 11108 other ranks killed, wounded and missing. German losses are estimated at a similar figure of 12000, which included 1687 prisoners.

Retrospective: Neuve Chapelle was the first planned British offensive of the war. It demonstrated that it was quite possible to break into the enemy positions - but also showed that this kind of success was not easily turned into breaking through them. The main lessons of Neuve Chapelle were that the artillery bombardment was too light to suppress the enemy defences; there were too few good artillery observation points; the reserves were too few to follow up success quickly; command communications took too long and the means of communicating were too vulnerable. One important lesson was perhaps not fully understood: the sheer weight of bombardment was a telling factor. Similar efforts in 1915 and 1916 would fall far short of its destructive power.
 
Cath, James Edward (I665)
 
97 Rumanian by birth Cocoresco, Alexandra (I743)
 
98 Rumanian by birth Constaninesco, George (I742)
 
99 Sarah Jane Norrish Hawke received from the Gresham Life Assurance Society the sum of 20,644 francs (approx 823 pounds) payment on the death of her husband in 1877.
"1ere Mad. Sarah Jane Norrish Goodridge, rentière Demeurant en la Commune de Corene, près Grenoble, Veuve de M. John Andrew Hawke -
Agissant tant en son nom personnel qu'au nom e comme tutrice legale de = John - James - William et Jane Hawke, tous quatre enfants mineurs nés de son union avec M. John Andrew Hawke et seuls heritiers audit sieur Hawke, leur père, aussi que le constate un acte de notoriete ?? par M. Desautels et son collegue, notaires à Grenoble, le 24 Decembre 1877 enregistré.

2eme M. John Snow Goodridge (Profession) demeurant à Grenoble.
Agissant au nom et comme Fideicommissaire ou exécuteur testamentaire de M. John Andrew Hawke, aux termes du testament de ce dernier fait olagraphe en date du 1er Mars 1876 - ouvert, décrit et deposé au rang des minutes de M. Desautels suivant ordennanace de M. le President du Gal? Civil de Grenoble du 19 Decembre 1877.
Reconnaissent avoir recu = ete? = (voir au dos)" - document.

Also Accounts for 1877-78 showing her Capital assets

From IGI

Sarah Norrish GOODRIDGE Sex: F
Event(s): Christening: 24 Sep 1837
Heavitree, Devon, England
Parents: Father: William GOODRIDGE
Mother: Sarah

Source Information: Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
C051061 1653-1837 0917199 Film 0933203 Film
Sheet: 
Goodridge, Sarah Jane Norrish (I578)
 
100 Sarah Jane Norrish Hawke received from the Gresham Life Assurance Society the sum of 20,644 francs (approx 823 pounds) payment on the death of her husband in 1877.
"1ere Mad. Sarah Jane Norrish Goodridge, rentière Demeurant en la Commune de Corene, près Grenoble, Veuve de M. John Andrew Hawke -
Agissant tant en son nom personnel qu'au nom e comme tutrice legale de = John - James - William et Jane Hawke, tous quatre enfants mineurs nés de son union avec M. John Andrew Hawke et seuls heritiers audit sieur Hawke, leur père, aussi que le constate un acte de notoriete ?? par M. Desautels et son collegue, notaires à Grenoble, le 24 Decembre 1877 enregistré.

2eme M. John Snow Goodridge (Profession) demeurant à Grenoble.
Agissant au nom et comme Fideicommissaire ou exécuteur testamentaire de M. John Andrew Hawke, aux termes du testament de ce dernier fait olagraphe en date du 1er Mars 1876 - ouvert, décrit et deposé au rang des minutes de M. Desautels suivant ordennanace de M. le President du Gal? Civil de Grenoble du 19 Decembre 1877.
Reconnaissent avoir recu = ete? = (voir au dos)" - document.

Also Accounts for 1877-78 showing her Capital assets

From IGI

Sarah Norrish GOODRIDGE Sex: F
Event(s): Christening: 24 Sep 1837
Heavitree, Devon, England
Parents: Father: William GOODRIDGE
Mother: Sarah

Source Information: Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
C0510611653-18370917199 Film0933203 Film
Sheet: 
Goodridge, Sarah Jane Norrish (I578)
 

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